Designer Ruthie Sommers

One of our absolute favorite LA-based designers is Ruthie Sommers. She has a gift for combining old-fashioned decorating with a daring mix of colors and eclectic pieces. It’s a style we try to emulate. We’ve learned that Ruthie shares our commitment to our go-to white paint color, Benjamin Moore Ivory White #925, and a love of everything chevron! In the December issue of Veranda magazine, Ruthie’s talent jumps off the beautiful pages. She decorated this Chicago apartment and created a home that personifies elegance. 
Sommers covered the walls of the entry way with panels of antique mirrored glass, then mounted antique crystal sconces over the seams. The layering is daring and magnificent. Oh, and what about the console table upholstered in goatskin? The dining room walls are covered in large-scale wallpaper depicting scenes of old India. We love round tables in dining rooms, and the bright green upholstered chairs make what could be a serious room look fresh and young. Notice the ceilings are painted a color to coordinate.

The walls in this hallway are lacquered in chocolate brown, and the doors are upholstered in an exotic fabric, trimmed with brass nail heads. Blue ceilings here, too. Every detail is so carefully considered. We love that she included a bench in the hallway. This one is covered in a wonderful yellow velvet.

We adore this bathroom and bedroom as it channels our love for all things pink and girly. The delicate canopy bed is embellished with bold lavender tassels. The floors in the bedroom are painted in  a geometric pattern, inspired by Sister Parish.

The play room is decorated with bright jewel tones to fend off the gray Chicago winter days. We’re loving the bold sofa color. The daughter’s bedroom below has a pleated sunburst canopy. Though its origins are very old-fashioned decorating, Ruthie’s interpretation is very modern. Notice how she included a touch of yellow along the edges of the valance to add another element of whimsy. What little girl wouldn’t love to wake up in this bedroom? I know one not so little girl who surely would.

What do you all think? Do these rooms speak to you, too?